Engage: Living or Nonliving?

Which of these things has basic needs?

SwingBirdhouseMonarch butterflyPink flowers in flowerpot

SquirrelRobin on a nest in a treeBrickTree

Which of these things produces offspring?

Explore 1: Living Things Have Basic Needs

Living things have basic needs.

What does a plant need to grow? Click the picture to explore what plants need to survive.

Seed to plant progression

What do animals need to survive? Click the picture to explore what animals need to survive. On the first screen, select the Really Hard level to get started.

Squirrel

 

Explore 2: Living Things Produce Offspring

Living things produce offspring.

Click the picture to explore living things and their offspring.

Robin on a nest in a tree

Click the picture, and match the baby animals to their parents. On the first screen, select the Hard level to get started.

Monarch butterfly

Explain: Living Organisms

Nonliving things do not have needs and do not produce offspring.
Living things have basic needs and produce offspring.

Animals are living things. Animals need air, food, water, and shelter.

Robin on a nest in a tree

A robin is an animal that needs air, food, water, and shelter. A robin builds a nest in a tree and lays eggs. Baby robins hatch from the eggs. The baby robins are the offspring of the robin.

 

Plants are living things. Plants need air, water, nutrients, sunlight, and space to grow.
 
An oak tree is a plant that needs air, water, nutrients, sunlight, and space to grow. An oak tree produces acorns. When an acorn is planted, a new oak tree grows.

 

 

 

 

tree  Seed to plant progression

Elaborate: Living or Nonliving?

Animals and plants depend on the living and nonliving things around them to meet their needs for survival.

Living things have basic needs and produce offspring.

Sort the pictures using the chart provided.

 

 

Hands-On Activity

Look out the window, or take a walk outside.

Take pictures, or make a list of the living and nonliving things you see.

Use the list or pictures to write 2–3 sentences about how living organisms depend on the things around them for survival. Here are two examples:

A  Squirrelmay find shelter in a  Tree.

           (squirrel)                                             (tree)

 

 

A       needs  Puddle of water  to live and grow.

              (tree)                         (water)

 

 

 

Evaluate

Test your knowledge of living and nonliving things.

To retake the quiz, reload the page, and then select "No" when the "Resume Quiz" dialog box appears.

 

Teacher Notes

This resource is a collection of interactive activities, videos, and other digital media assembled in a conceptually scaffolded 5E lesson format. It provides alternative or additional Tier I learning options for students learning about living and nonliving things, TEKS (K)(9)(A) and (B). The assignments require student participation with self-checked and teacher-checked formative assessment opportunities. For example, after students record observations and data in their notebooks, they may be prompted to be prepared to share their answers with the class.

Check for prerequisite knowledge, differentiation needs, and student follow-up requirements (as necessary) by reviewing the resource before assigning it to or working through it with your students.

Engage

Identify and discuss the living and nonliving things pictured. Student responses may vary at this time.

The butterfly, flowers, squirrel, birds, and tree all have basic needs and produce offspring. Throughout this lesson, students will learn that living things have basic needs and produce offspring.

  • A butterfly lays an egg. A caterpillar hatches from the egg, eats, and grows until it forms its chrysalis. The caterpillar then emerges as a butterfly.
  • A flower produces seeds that grow into plants that produce more flowers.
  • Squirrels and other animals have babies that are born alive and grow to resemble their parents.
  • Birds lay eggs. Baby birds or chicks hatch from those eggs and then eat and grow to resemble their parents.
  • A tree produces seeds (nuts) that grow into trees that produce more seeds.

Explore

Living Things Have Basic Needs

1. Read the text to the students.

2. Follow the link to the Plant Activity.

On the first screen, students can control the amount of water and heat the plant receives as it grows.  Students should click the grow button, then click the water and heat levers as the plant grows to see how different amounts of water and heat impact the plant. Students can also lower the window shade to investigate how sunlight affects the plant.

3. Follow the link to the Animal Activity.

On the first screen, select Really Hard. Students should read or listen to the instructions and select the correct items to meet the needs of each animal.

Living Things Produce Offspring

1. Read the text to the students.

2. Follow the link to the Living Things Activity.

On the first screen, students will be asked to identify the living things on the playground using the camera. Students should move the camera over and select the following organisms: squirrel, buttercup (bunch of yellow flowers), dandelion (single yellow flower), butterfly, earthworm, sparrow, oak tree, and ant. Learn about each organism by selecting the hand lens next to it.

3. Select Sorter 2 to match the plants or animals to their offspring. Students should match the oak tree to the acorn, the butterfly to the caterpillar, the sparrow to the egg, and the dandelion to the dandelion seed head. If time allows, select Sorter 1 to allow students to match each organism with where it was found in the picture.

4. Follow the link to the Animal Activity.

5. From the first screen, select Hard. Students should read or listen to the instructions and select the parent for the organism shown.

Explain

Students should differentiate between living and nonliving things based upon whether they have basic needs and produce offspring. Students should examine evidence that living organisms have basic needs such as food, water, and shelter for animals and air, water, nutrients, sunlight, and space for plants.

Read the text to the students.

Use these questions to facilitate a discussion about living things, what they need, how they meet those needs, and what offspring they produce.

  1. Where does a robin find shelter?
  2. How do you know an animal needs food and water?
  3. What would happen if a robin could not find food?
  4. Do all animals need the same type of shelter?
  5. Do all animals lay eggs?

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  1. Where does the oak tree get its nutrients?
  2. What are some ways the oak tree gets water?
  3. What does an oak tree produce?

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  1. What happens when a seed is planted?
  2. How do you know a plant needs water?
  3. What would happen if a plant did not receive sunlight/light?
  4. What would happen if we planted six to eight plants close together?

Elaborate

Students should sort the images on the T-chart to show that they can differentiate between living and nonliving things.

Encourage students to explain why they placed each image in the category they chose. Students should be able to explain that the images in the living column have basic needs and produce offspring. They should also be able to explain that the images in the nonliving column do not have basic needs and do not produce offspring.

Hands-On Activity

Be prepared to lead students in making observations outside or to find pictures of several different environments for students to observe. If you have access to a camera, take pictures of several living and nonliving things students observe. Use these pictures or pictures drawn by students to write two to three sentences about how living organisms depend on the things around them for survival.

Evaluate

Students should follow the instructions for each question to complete the quiz.