Engage: Where Does the Water Go?

Observe the picture.

Water Cycle Illustration

Watch the below video.

Peep and the Big Wide World- The Disappearing Drink.mp4

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What do you think happened to the Peep’s water?
How are the picture and the video related?

Hands-On Activity Icon
Get a clear plastic container—a cup or jar would work best. Fill the container half-full with water. Use a marker or piece of tape to mark the water level on the side of the container. Set the container on a table or counter out of the way. Observe the container, and mark the water level over time.

Explore: Explore the Water Cycle

What is the water cycle?
Click the picture to explore the processes in the water cycle.

What is the role of the Sun in the water cycle?
Click the picture to explore the role of the Sun in the water cycle.

Water Drop Game Picture

*Some materials in this resource are from outside sources. TEA has chosen to include them for the value of the content even if grammatical or punctuation errors exist.

 

 

Source: 
www.educationsoutheastwater.com.au

Explain: The Water Cycle

Water is constantly recycled though the process of the water cycle.
Watch the video to learn about the water cycle.

PLUM114_Postcard_WW1_encoded_h264-16x9-mp4-1200k_1.mp4

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Source: 
• Earth to Blorb: Water! downloaded from PBS LearningMedia, http://www.pbslearningmedia.org. Rights to use this asset expire on do not expire. • Asset Copyright © 2014 WGBH Educational Foundation. PLUM LANDING is a trademark or registered trademark of WGB

Click the picture to learn about the water cycle.

Water Cycle Illustration

*Some materials in this resource are from outside sources. TEA has chosen to include them for the value of the content even if grammatical or punctuation errors exist.

Elaborate: Water Cycle in a Bag

Hands-On Activity Icon
See Teacher Notes for instructions.

Water Cycle in a Bag Image

Evaluate

Write a note to explain to Peep what happened to the water and how it relates to the water cycle. Include a description and illustration of the water cycle.

Teacher Notes

This resource is a collection of interactive activities, videos, and other digital media assembled in a conceptually scaffolded 5E lesson format. It provides alternative or additional Tier I learning options for students learning about the processes in the water cycle studen expectation 2(8)(C). The assignments require student participation with self-checked and teacher-checked formative assessment opportunities. For example, after students record observations and data in their notebooks, they may be prompted to be prepared to share their answers with the class.

Check for prerequisite knowledge, differentiation needs, and student follow-up requirements (as necessary) by reviewing the resource before assigning it to or working through it with your students.

Engage
Observe the illustration of the water cycle. Watch the video.
What happened to the water? Student responses may vary at this time. Students will learn through this lesson that Peep’s water evaporated.
How are the picture and the video related? Student responses may vary at this time. Students will connect the water disappearing/evaporating in the video to the process of evaporation as they learn about the water cycle.

Explore
What is the water cycle?
Students should follow the instructions to explore the processes in the water cycle.
Read the words on the screen. Students should:
1. Move the vapor up to the sky to make the water from the sea rise.
2. Move the cloud to the left to place it over the mountains.
3. Click the rain cloud three times to make it rain.
4. Click on the river to make the water flow to the sea.
5. Place the words in their correct positions.

What is the role of the Sun in the water cycle?
Students should follow the instructions to explore the role of the Sun in the water cycle.

Student should use the arrows to move the water drop and direct the Sun’s rays. Students will see that energy from the Sun causes the water to evaporate. Clouds will form and grow, eventually dropping rain and snow on the land.  Students will see that heat from the Sun causes the snow to melt and the water returns to the ground and sea.

Explain
Students will learn that water is constantly recycled though the process of the water cycle. And heat from the Sun causes water to rise into the air around us as water vapor. We call this evaporation. The water vapor cools as it rises into the sky. The water vapor (gas) eventually condenses into water droplets (liquid), or ice if it is cold enough, and forms clouds. We call this process condensation. The water droplets grow and become too heavy and fall to the Earth’s surface as rain, hail, or sleet. Any water that falls from the sky is called precipitation.


Elaborate
Materials

  • water bottle lid
  • recording sheet
  • resealable plastic bag
  • tape
  • water

1. Fill the water bottle lid with water.
2. Place the lid with water in the corner of the bag and seal the bag.
3. Tape the bag to sunny window.
4. Observe the bag over time.

Students will notice that the heat from the sun causes the water from the lid to evaporate. The water vapor condenses into small water droplets on the sides of the bag. These droplets will drip down the sides of the bag and collect under the lid.


Evaluate
Students should inform Peep that the water did not disappear—it evaporated. Students should describe and illustrate the processes of the water cycle. Use the rubric to assess student work.