Introduction

Introduction

Stats Lab 1.1

Data Collection Experiment

Class Time

Names:

Student Learning Outcomes
  • The student will demonstrate the systematic sampling technique.
  • The student will construct relative frequency tables.
  • The student will interpret results and their differences from different data groupings.

Movie SurveyGet a class roster/list. Randomly mark a person’s name, and then mark every fourth name on the list until you get 12 names—you may have to go back to the start of the list. For each name marked, record the number of movies they saw at the theater last month.

Order the DataComplete the two relative frequency tables below using your class data.

Number of Movies Frequency Relative Frequency Cumulative Relative Frequency
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7+
Table 1.20 Frequency of Number of Movies Viewed
Number of Movies Frequency Relative Frequency Cumulative Relative Frequency
0–1
2–3
4–5
6–7+
Table 1.21 Frequency of Number of Movies Viewed
  1. Using the tables, find the percent of data that is at most two. Which table did you use and why?
  2. Using the tables, find the percent of data that is at most three. Which table did you use and why?
  3. Using the tables, find the percent of data that is more than two. Which table did you use and why?
  4. Using the tables, find the percent of data that is more than three. Which table did you use and why?
Discussion Questions
  1. Is one of the tables more correct than the other? Why or why not?
  2. In general, how could you group the data differently? Are there any advantages to either way of grouping the data?
  3. Why did you switch between tables, if you did, when answering the question above?